Destination: Germany.

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Germany At A Glance


Prepare for a roller coaster of feasts, treats and temptations as you take in Germany's soul-stirring scenery, spirit-lifting culture, big-city beauties, romantic palaces and half-timbered towns.

There's something undeniably artistic in the way Germany's scenery unfolds – the corrugated, dune-fringed coasts of the north; the moody forests, romantic river valleys and vast vineyards of the centre, and the off-the-charts splendour of the Alps, carved into rugged glory by glaciers and the elements. All are integral parts of a magical natural matrix that's bound to give your camera batteries a workout. Get off the highway and into the great outdoors to soak up the epic landscapes that makes each delicious, slow, winding mile so precious.

Few countries have had as much impact on the world as Germany, which has given us the Hanseatic League, the Reformation, the printing press, the automobile, aspirin and MP3 technology. It is the birthplace of Martin Luther, Albert Einstein and Karl Marx, of Goethe, Beethoven, the Brothers Grimm and other heavyweights who, each in their own way, have left their mark on human history. You can stand in a Roman amphitheatre, sleep in a medieval castle and walk along remnants of the Berlin Wall – in Germany the past is very much present wherever you go.

Bavaria

From the cloud-shredding Alps to the fertile Danube plain, the Free State of Bavaria is a place that keeps its clichéd promises. Story-book castles bequeathed by an oddball king poke through dark forest, cowbells tinkle in flower-filled meadows, the thwack of palm on lederhosen accompanies the clump of frothy stein on timber bench, and medieval walled towns go about their time-warped business.

But diverse Bavaria offers much more than the chocolate-box idyll. Sip world-class wines in Würzburg, get on the Wagner trail in Bayreuth or seek out countless kiddy attractions across the state. Destinations are often described as possessing ‘something for everyone’, but in Bavaria’s case this is no exaggeration. And, whatever you do in Germany’s southeast, every occasion is infused with that untranslatable feel-good air of Gemütlichkeit (cosiness) that makes exploring the region such an easygoing experience.

Destination Upper Bavaria: Bad Aibling

When we were producing some video footage we had the opportunity to visit Bad Aibling for the very first time. The Alpes mountains are well in sight and the River Inn valley is not far away.

This town has many different facettes which is unusual for a spa town. Bad Aibling is Bavaria's oldest mud bath and youngest thermal spa at the same time. Many clincs make this place to a true health care town for all who want to become or stay healthy.

30th ADAC Bavaria Historic 2017

During the 30th anniversary of the vintage car rallye called ADAC Bavaria Historic from June 15 to 17, 2017 the organisation planned three days packed with highlights during three stages driving through the Bavaria's alpine upland and neighbouring Austria. Two years ago the concept was altered to a touristical tour with constancy checks which proved itself as its granting good chances, too, for very old cars and those with the smaller engines to manage the about 375 mls long distance. Spread over three days the journey begins after the Prologue on Corpus Christi day during the Maxlrainer Oldie Feelings party.

Saltalpes Trail

Long-distance hiking from Lake Chiemsee visiting Lake Königssee to Lake Hallstatt in Austria: In spring of 2015 the Salt Alpes Trail was opened as a new trail. More than 233 kms long it runs from Prien at Lake Chiemsee right across the Chiemgau region and Berchtesgaden Country to Obertraun at Lake Hallstatt at the foot of Dachstein mountains in Austria. We prefer travelling that route on an e-bike to visit the most beautiful and most interesting places in the region.

Hike & Relax at Lake Königssee

Crossing the serenely picturesque, emerald-green Königssee makes for some unforgettable memories and once-in-a-lifetime photo opportunities. Cradled by steep mountain walls some 5km south of Berchtesgaden, the emerald-green ...

Zugspitz Impressions

So that is what it feels like to have Germany at your feet: At precisely 2,962 metres above sea level, the Zugspitz mountain is the highest in the country, home to three glaciers and Germany’s highest ski resort. All the 20km of ...

Bavarian Tradition

From the cloud-shredding Alps to the fertile Danube plain, the Free State of Bavaria is a place that keeps its clichéd promises. Story- book castles bequeathed by an oddball king poke through dark forest, cowbells tinkle in flower-filled meadows, the thwack of palm on lederhosn accompanies the clump of frothy stein on timber bench, and medieval walled towns go about their time-warped business.

Old Bavarian Craftmanship

For centuries the Chiemgau is an industrial hotspot. We visit two historical sites, one is the old Maxhütte in Bergen, where you can find a beautifully renovated museum displaying the ancient products and production process - and the water powered Bell Forge of Ruhpolding, which products were well know at the time all across Europe.

Rhineland-Palatinate

Rhineland-Palatinate (German: Rheinland-Pfalz) is is reputed for its rugged landscapes, as well as its wines from the valleys of the Moselle and Rhine. Indeed, this state produces 2/3 of all German wines, and is the only state to have a wine minister. In 2002, the Rhine Gorge (the 65km section of the river between Koblenz and Bingen) was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site for for its unique combination of geological, historical and cultural elements.

We are collecting footage from the famous «German Wine Road» (Deutsche Weinstrasse). The coverage of this area may be found at this place in due course.

The North

Germany's Northern States are called Lower Saxony, Schleswig-Holstein, Hamburg, and Bremen. The countryside is mostly flat or covered by gently rolling hills and rich farmland carved up by canals and rivers, with big skies and big cattle and handsome brick-built farmhouses.

In the North is Germany’s North Sea coastline, a place to spoil yourself in the westerly winds carrying a salt-laden breeze and the smoked (mostly) Herring. There you'll find traditional family resorts in summer, while the island of Helgoland tries to establish itself as an all-year spa.

Then there is Bremerhaven and Cuxhaven, two ports and resorts with with a history, particularly when it comes to the little-told stories of European emigration to the US.

The North’s biggest city is Hamburg, with waterways and alledgedly more bridges than Venice, and a massive port at its heart. Famous for its Reeperbahn, once Europe’s sauciest mile but now host to more mainstream entertainment. Finally there's Hamburg’s warehouse waterfront HafenCity which is the home for the recently opened Elb-Philharmony.

Beyond Hamburg, the North goes right up the neck of Germany past the collar of the Kiel Canal, Europe’s Panama, which links the North and the Baltic Sea. Passing Kiel towards the north it blends, almost seamlessly, with Denmark, with the sandy island of Sylt, popular with families and the northern jet-set, as an afterthought attached to the neck’s west coast.